The Review/Feature/

Canadian Filmmakers on the Elements of Filmmaking. And the Elements.

Making a film in Canada requires talent, hard work, and a warm coat

by
Sep 23, 2016

For a Canadian filmmaker shooting in this country, working in nature (and keeping your crew comfortable and warm while you do it) is an essential part of the job. At TIFF '16, we took the opportunity to talk to three exceptional filmmakers with features at Festival — Kim Nguyen, Chloé Robichaud, and Nathan Morlando — about their creative process, what they've learned on sets, and how a crew comes together to get a movie made, regardless of what nature throws their way.

The Canadian Filmmaker Series was produced in collaboration with Canada Goose, sponsor of the Best Canadian Feature Award.

Kim Nguyen

Kim Nguyen is a Canadian film director and screenwriter. His latest film, Two Lovers and a Bear, stars Tatiana Maslany, Dane DeHaan, and yes, a bear. The film was shot in Iqaluit and Nunavut — in extreme conditions — and had its North American premiere at TIFF '16. Nguyen is also known for his Academy Award-nominated and Canadian Screen Award-winning film Rebelle (War Witch), which played at TIFF '12.

Chloé Robichaud

Canadian filmmaker Chloé Robichaud was at TIFF '16 with her second feature, Boundaries (Pays), a film about a fictional island nation called Besco located off the coast of Canada. The film touches on the importance of the land and the impact of industries like mining; in the video above Chloe talks about writing female characters, shooting in Newfoundland and Fogo Island, and the necessity of not taking our natural resources for granted.

Nathan Morlando

Nathan Morlando is a Canadian director and screenwriter whose second feature, Mean Dreams, had its North American premiere at TIFF '16. The film focuses on the forbidden romance between two teens on the run, and it is suffused with beautiful (and sometimes desolate) imagery from the Ontario locations where it was shot. In the piece above, Nathan talks about being pushed to your limits by shooting outdoors, working as a team on set, and the responsibility of creating stories for a global audience.