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The Review/News/

Announcing the TIFF '17 Award Winners

And the awards go to...

PCA Winner - Three Billboards Meme

by
Sep 17, 2017

After 339 films in 11 days, this year's edition of the Toronto International Film Festival has come to an end. As always, that means only one thing: It's time to reveal the Grolsch People's Choice Winner. From 12 Years a Slave and Room, to last year's La La Land, through your votes, you have championed films in past years that stick with us — and this year is no exception.

Check out the TIFF Awards Ceremony and full list of winners below.

Grolsch People's Choice Awards
This year marked the 40th year that Toronto audiences were able to cast a ballot for their favourite Festival film for the Grolsch People’s Choice Award.

The Grolsch People’s Choice Award:
Winner — Martin McDonagh's Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

The Festival presents a free screening of Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri at Roy Thomson Hall at 6pm. Tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis beginning at 4 pm at Roy Thomson Hall.

First runner-up: Craig Gillespie’s I, Tonya
Second runner-up: Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name

 

The Grolsch People’s Choice Midnight Madness Award:
Winner: Joseph Kahn’s Bodied
Second runner-up: Craig Zahler’s Brawl in Cell Block 99
First runner-up: James Franco’s The Disaster Artist

Bodied

The Grolsch People’s Choice Documentary Award:
Winner: Agnès Varda and JR’s Faces Places
Second runner-up: Morgan Spurlock’s Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!
First runner-up: Long Time Running by Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas De Pencier

Faces, Places

 

International Jury Awards

TORONTO PLATFORM PRIZE PRESENTED BY AIR FRANCE

For its third year of the Platform programme of director’s cinema, the Festival welcomed an international jury comprised of Chen Kaige, Malgorzata Szumowska, and Wim Wenders.

Winner: Warwick Thornton’s Sweet Country
Jury remarks: “This is a spiritual epic taking place in 1929 in Australia’s Northern Territory. It is a great saga of human fate, and its themes of race and struggle for survival are handled in such a simple, rich, unpretentious and touching way, that it became for us a deeply emotional metaphor for our common fight for dignity.”

Sweet Country

Speaking about their deliberations, the Jury statement added: “We saw twelve films from all over the world that took us into very different universes of the soul and to extremely different places on our planet. We were thankful to be able to see these films and we very much appreciated that actually exactly half of them were made by women. TIFF is leading the way, we feel. As we only had one award to give, we had to be quite radical. We also limited ourselves to only one special mention, even if other films might have imposed themselves for best acting, writing or directing.”

Awarding a special mention to Clio Barnard’s Dark River, the Jury said: “This film deeply rooted in the Yorkshire countryside convinced us, as its characters and actors, its photography, its story and its sense of place were all so utterly believable and controlled, that we were totally taken by it.”

New this year, the Festival presents a free screening of Toronto Platform Prize winner Sweet Country at TIFF Bell Lightbox at 8:30 pm on September 17. Tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis beginning at 6:30 pm.

 

THE PRIZES OF THE INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF FILM CRITICS (FIPRESCI PRIZES)
Winner - Discovery: Sadaf Foroughi’s Ava
Winner - Special Presentations: Manuel Martín Cuenca’s The Motive (El Autor)

Ava

The Motive (El Autor)

The Festival welcomed an international FIPRESCI jury composed of jury president Jonathan Rosenbaum (USA), Robert Daudelin (Canada), Martin Horyna (Czech Republic), Ivonete Pinto (Brazil), Marietta Steinhart (Austria), and Jim Slotek (Canada).

 

NETPAC AWARD
Winner: Huang Hsin-Yao’s The Great Buddha+
Jury remarks: “The NETPAC Jury awards The Great Buddha+ for depicting the interface between the haves and have-nots, with black humour and style, innovating with noir in representing the social reality of Taiwan today.”

The Great Buddha+

Jury members include jury chairperson Rashmi Doraiswamy (India), Jian Hao (China), and Savine Wong (Canada).

 

Short Film Jury Awards

The short film awards below were selected by a jury comprised of Marit van den Elshout, Johnny Ma, and Chloé Zhao.

Pre-Drink

The Burden (Min Börda)

IWC SHORT CUTS AWARD FOR BEST CANADIAN SHORT FILM
Winner: Marc-Antoine Lemire’s Pre-Drink
Jury remarks: “A monumental yet intimate portrayal of a woman in transition.“

IWC SHORT CUTS AWARD FOR BEST SHORT FILM
Winner: Niki Lindroth von Bahr’s The Burden (Min Börda)
Jury remarks: “Whimsical but tragic, imaginative and just plain weird, this is exactly what one can expect from a Scandinavian musical with fish in bath robes singing out their existentialist crisis. This is a film that stands out in this program and any film program it will ever be part of.”

Honourable mentions to Matthew Rankin’s The Tesla World Light (Tesla: Lumière Mondiale) and Qiu Yang’s Xiao Cheng Er Yue (A Gentle Night).

 

Canadian Film Jury Awards

The Canadian awards below were selected by a jury comprised of Mark Adams, Min Sook Lee, and Ella Cooper.

Luk' Luk'l

Les Affamés

CITY OF TORONTO AWARD FOR BEST CANADIAN FIRST FEATURE FILM
Winner: Wayne Wapeemukwa’s Luk' Luk'l
Jury remarks: “The award goes to a striking debut film that disrupts borders - of form and content and suggests new cinematic territories. This beautifully realized film offers a unique Canadian perspective, made with real compassion, insight and remarkable characters from Vancouver’s East Side.”

Honourable mention to Sadaf Foroughi’s Ava.

CANADA GOOSE AWARD FOR BEST CANADIAN FEATURE FILM
Winner: Robin Aubert’s Les Affamés.
Jury remarks: “A hybrid art-house film that proved to be something of a revelation. Wonderfully scripted and perfectly cast, this film managed the rare feat of featuring genuinely interesting and well-rounded characters; surprising dramatic and comedic moments with well thought-out multi-generational female roles (who were totally badass) while also dealing with poignant and contemporary issues, set against a striking rural backdrop and hundreds of ‘ravenous’ zombies.”

Honourable mention to Simon Lavoie’s The Little Girl Who Was Too Fond of Matches (La petite fille qui aimait trop les allumettes).


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