We Can't Make the Same Mistake Twice

163 minutesPG

Sun
Apr 2
  • Press & Industry screenings and events are only for accredited passes.

Métis lawyer Amanda Carling joins filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin (Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance) to discuss Obomsawin's new documentary that chronicles the events following the filing of a human-rights complaint by a group of activists, which charged that the federal government's woefully inadequate funding of services for Indigenous children constituted a discriminatory practice.

Guest
Alanis Obomsawin

Alanis Obomsawin was born in New Hampshire and raised in Quebec. A singer, songwriter, printmaker, and engraver, she has also written and directed many documentary features, including Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance (93), Rocks at Whiskey Trench (00), Is the Crown at War with Us? (02), Hi-Ho Mistahey! (13), and Trick or Treaty? (14), all of which screened at the Festival. We Can't Make the Same Mistake Twice (16) is her latest film.

Guest
Amanda Carling

Amanda Carling is a Métis lawyer who grew up in Winnipeg and earned her undergraduate degree in criminology at the University of Manitoba. She graduated from the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law in June 2012. As a law student, Amanda co-chaired the Aboriginal Law Students' Association (ALSA) for two years, worked at Downtown Legal Services (DLS) in the criminal and family law divisions and started a yoga program. Amanda completed her articles with Innocence Canada (formerly the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted (AIDWYC)). Following her call to the bar, Amanda launched Innocence Canada's Legal Education Initiative in an effort to forward the prevention aspect of the organization's mandate. Amanda has served on the Board of Directors for Aboriginal Legal Services (formerly Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto (ALST)) since 2010. For several years she was the Board Secretary and she is currently the Board President.