Bill Morrison on Dawson City: Frozen Time

120 minutesPG

Mon
Nov 20
  • Press & Industry screenings and events are only for accredited passes.
  • This event is free. Tickets are distributed at the venue two hours before the start of the event. (One ticket per person.)

As part of Reel Heritage, a TIFF initiative devoted to exploring and promoting the importance of film preservation, director Bill Morrison joins us to present his new film — which chronicles the discovery and preservation of 500 nitrate silent films that were found buried in Dawson City, Yukon — and to discuss his work with Library and Archives Canada to digitize this extraordinary treasure trove of footage.

Individual students wishing to reserve a ticket in advance (limit one per person) may do so using the sign-up form on this page. Administrators or faculty looking to reserve a block of tickets to this event can email hlf@tiff.net with their request. This event is also open to the public. Tickets will be made available starting two hours from the Box Office.

Students: Sign up for a free ticket

EducationPreservation
Guest
Bill Morrison

Bill Morrison is a New York–based filmmaker and artist. His films often combine rare archival material set to contemporary music, and include The Great Flood (13) and Dawson City: Frozen Time (16). His first feature film, Decasia (02), was selected to the U.S. Library of Congress’ 2013 National Film Registry. Morrison is a Guggenheim Fellow and has received a fellowship from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts. In 2014 the Museum of Modern Art mounted a mid-career retrospective of his work.

Guest
Paul Gordon

Paul Gordon is a Senior Film Conservator for Library and Archives Canada. He is an independent film producer, film projectionist, and graduate of Ryerson's film program. Gordon was also involved in the founding of Western Arctic Moving Pictures, a video/film co-op based in Yellowknife. He promotes film preservation wherever he can and is a programmer for The Lost Dominion Screening Collection, which focuses on showing Canadian archival films on film.